Skiathos Greece:: SKIATHOS TRIBUTES ::Alexandros Papadiamantis

Quick Navigation

Alexandros Papadiamantis

<p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Alexandros Papadiantis Skiathos " width="500" height="432"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Alexandros Papadiantis Skiathos " width="390" height="439"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Upright Yiannis Vlachogiannis with Alexandros Papadiamantis in Athens. Winter 1908." width="482" height="325"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Portrait of the painter Giorgos Kordis , public versions Armos. Source 7 Days Kathimerini newspaper " width="503" height="768"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="His father Alexandros Papadiamantis , priest Adamantios Emmanouil ( 1817 - 1895 ) . Source 7 Days Kathimerini newspaper " width="590" height="751"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Alexandros Papadiamantis Murderss ( Fonissa ). Poster Tasos Zografos for the Murderess of Costas Ferris. Source 7 Days Kathimerini newspaper " width="610" height="765"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="The House of Papadiamantis in Skiathos. Today you can visit it at Skiathos as is a museum." width="397" height="514"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="The house rented by Alexandros Papadiamantis in Athens. Sketch of Sp. Vassiliou magazine Greek Letters 1928." width="409" height="409"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="Photo: Dimitris Papadimos. The house of Alexandros Papadiamantis in Skiathos was declared monument and a museum since 1965." width="506" height="578"/> <p>Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.</p>

<p>He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.</p>

<p>He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.</p>

<p>From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.</p>

<p>He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.</p>

<p>He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.</p>

<p>His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary  journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.</p>

<p>The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.</p>

<p>On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.</p>

<p>WORKS Some of his works…</p>

<p>Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.</p>

<iframe width=

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.

" title="The logo of the Museum House of Alexandros Papadiamantis in Skiathos." width="224" height="161"/>

Alexandros Papadiamantis, characterized as the monk of the people of Greek Literature and Letters, was born on the island of Skiathos on 4 March, 1851.

He was the son of a priest Adamantios Emmanouil (from whom he got his surname) and Gioulo (Aggeliki) Moraitidis, a descendant of a noble family.

He had two brothers, Emmanouil and Georgios, and four sisters, Ourania, Harikleia, Sofoula and Kiratsoula.

From a poor and large family, without the means to move on but with the desire for education and learning inside, he managed to finish school with difficulty. After primary school he enrolled at the lycee but was forced to follow the third class on Skopelos, as on Skiathos it had been abolished.

He was forced to interrupt his high-school studies many times because of the financial situation of his family. Finally, he graduated at the age of 23 from the Varvakeion High School of Athens. Immediately after, in 1872, he left for Mount Athos with his friend Dianelos Nikolaos and later Monk Nifonas. Not deeming himself worthy of this, he returned to the world a few months later.

He enrolls in the Philosophy School of the University of Athens, from which, however, he never graduates. He learns English and French by himself. His writer cousin Alexandros Moraitidis (later a Monk) is his friend and companion and brings him into contact with literary and journalistic circles of the time.

His works begin to get published in Neologos newspaper, in Mi hanesai magazine, and in the newspapers Efimeris and Akropolis. Journalism and translations become a bread-winning profession and his cooperations with magazines and newspapers increase. Large potential opens out for a Literary journalistic career in Athens. However, the modest monk of the people is not moved. His contacts with everyday folk but also the hours he spends chanting from the position of the right-hand cantor in Saint Elissaios in Monastiraki are the only things that please him.

The rheumatisms he gets in his hands make it difficult for him to continue his journalistic work. He finally returns to Skiathos ill and with no funds. On the eve of his death, he was presented with the medal of the Cross of the Saviour.

On the evening of 2 January, 1911 he chanted for the last time with a trembling voice and the same night, in the morning hours of 3rd January, he passed away.

WORKS Some of his works…

Papadiamantis unique work was scattered among newspapers and magazines and only recently has it been collected. His Christmas stories, the American, Sto Hristo sto Kastro, Horis Stefani, and the amazing psychographic novels such as I Fonissa, I Giftopoula, To Hristopsomo, have moved every reader despite the particular language he uses. His two inspirations were Skiathos and Orthodoxy. Elements in his novels are the mother, the absence of the father, water, wine, nature, the abyss and anguish of identity. The monk of the people of Greek Literature had his whole island as his cell. Through his novels Skiathos of that time is presented as a place where the most powerful tradition of the Greek way of life is experienced.

 

  AND WONDERFUL SONGS WRITTEN FOR HIS VERSES ...

 

Poem: Alexandros Papadiamantis ~ Music: Manolis Liapakis, Kostas Pantazis and Nikos Mastorakis ~ Singer: Sokratis Malamas~

Photos Credits 7 IMERES KATHIMERINI, with refers about the Photos, Special Thanks to National Historic Museum , mr Triant. Papazisis and F. Dimitrakopoulos, for the archive photo albums. Especially mr Chr. Chimona for its general help.